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Tag: ACNE MYTHS

Everything you need to know about Acne Treatments

Words
Ellie Taylor
Reading Time
6 min read
Tags
ACNE MYTHS
SKIN TREATMENT
SKINCARE

Here at DestinationSkin we want to help you feel confident in the skin you’re in. We know acne can have a huge impact on your physical and mental wellbeing, so we offer a range of tailored treatments to help combat your concerns along with our trusted experts who will help you on your journey to a happy, healthy complexion. Carry on reading to find out all you need to know about acne and the acne treatments we offer.

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What is acne and what are the types?

Acne is an inflammatory condition of the skin involving the sebaceous glands. Acne commonly presents during adolescence when circulating levels of androgens (a type of hormone) cause an increase in the amount of sebum produced by the sebaceous glands. This increase in sebum can cause hair follicle blockage, leading to inflammation and overgrowth of the normal bacteria that colonise the skin. This process is responsible for the characteristic skin lesions presenting on the face, back, trunk and upper arms.

 

The types

There are a variety of ways that acne can appear on the skin, ranging from small clogged pores (whiteheads or blackheads), to red, swollen cystic nodules.

  • Comedones (or white/blackheads) – sebum and dead skin cells block the follicle. If the comedone is closed (covered by a thin sheet of skin cells), a whitehead is formed. If the comedone is open, a blackhead is formed.
  • Papules or pustules – as the hair follicle continues to remain blocked, the sebaceous gland continues to produce sebum which causes pressure to build up and inflammation to worsen. This causes the characteristic redness and swelling associated with a spot.
  • Cysts – As pustules become larger and inflammation worsens, the lesions can coalesce to form cysts.

 

How to get rid of acne

Traditionally, acne treatment has centred around topical creams and lotions and systemic antibiotic therapy. Whilst these treatments provide solutions for many, recent technological advancements and improved understanding of acne have paved the way for more effective treatment methods with fewer side effects.

 

Chemical peels

Chemical peel treatments can be used as a skin resurfacing method by exfoliating the epidermis and leaving a refreshed and renewed appearance. Chemical peels work by breaking down keratin that is blocking the follicle, decreasing sebum production and reducing inflammation.

Our range of chemical peels at DestinationSkin include several options that are suitable for acne-prone skin that are designed to help improve the appearance of spots as well as acne scars. Read more about chemical peels at DestinationSkin here.

 

Microdermabrasion and microneedling

Microneedling involves the use of tiny sterile needles to create micropunctures in the skin to stimulate the wound healing process in the dermis without causing significant damage to the epidermis. The wound healing process causes an increase in the amount of growth factors in the skin. These growth factors act to increase the production of collagen and elastin in the dermis.

Similarly, microdermabrasion removes the outermost layer of the epidermis, upregulates the wound healing process and increases collagen density in the dermis.

Both treatment methods are effective methods of treating acne scarring and microdermabrasion can also provide a deep exfoliation through the use of microcrystals. Click here to read more about both treatments.

 

How long does acne last?

Although acne is common during adolescence, the condition can often continue into the thirties and beyond. Acne can persist in individuals who are affected by other medical conditions including polycystic ovarian syndrome.

 

Can you get acne during adulthood?

In short, yes. Adult acne is a relatively common condition affecting around 20% of men and 8% of women. There can be hormonal imbalances associated with adult acne and some of those affected may have a genetic predisposition. Many of those with adult acne have a history of the condition since adolescence that may have either persisted or relapsed later on in life.

 

What are acne scars and how to get rid of them?

In acne, the inflammation associated with the papules, pustules and cysts leads to altered wound healing. During this process, collagen is produced and degraded, the dermal structure is altered, and scar tissue is formed.

Depending on the type and severity of acne scarring, treatment options range from microneedling and microdermabrasion to chemical peel and laser-based treatment options.

A consultation with an expert dermatological professional at DestinationSkin will enable you to create the ideal treatment plan to address your acne or acne scarring.

Book your free consultation now

 


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Does stress cause breakouts? Common acne myths debunked

Words
Ellie Taylor
Reading Time
6 min read
Tags
ACNE MYTHS
SKIN TREATMENT
SKINCARE

There’s a lot of information out there about acne. From tips from our parents, to old wives’ tales and home remedies. But how do we know what is true, and what really works in acne treatment?

Our Group Clinical Director, Dr Toni Phillips has taken a look at the most-googled acne questions, as well as common myths to help clear up both your skin and the facts….

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Q: How does acne form?

A: Acne is a condition which mainly involves the pilosebaceous gland. This is the oil gland in the skin that is attached to a hair follicle – which then appears at an opening in the skin. Acne is a condition where there is excessive sebum production from the oil gland, accompanied by inflammation and bacteria which leads to clogging up of the pores, producing a pimple.

Image of woman with acne

 

Q: Does acne run in families?

A: There is no one cause of acne. There can be a familial tendency in certain severe cases, but it’s not actually a genetic disease. Typically, hormonal influences can trigger the sebaceous glands to be more active than usual, causing acne.

 

Q: Can acne be caused by stress?

A: Stress doesn’t cause acne directly; however heightened levels of stress can cause the adrenal glands to go into overdrive. Adrenal glands are in charge of regulating stress and can stimulate sebaceous glands to secrete more sebum (oil). This excess oil can cause acne.

 

Q: Does chocolate cause acne?

A: There is little evidence that chocolate specifically causes acne. However certain diets can predispose an individual to acne, such as high milk and dairy intake or high calorie intake because these diets can encourage certain growth hormones that can stimulate the oil gland and when the oil gland is more active, acne tends to form.

 

Q: Why do I get acne on different areas of my face?

A: An interesting fact is that the sebaceous glands associated with acne, are a genetic remnant from the pre-historic days when humans had complete facial hair! Therefore, different areas can be affected by acne, and where it appears on the face comes down to the number of sebaceous units a person has in that area. Some people might have a very high number of sebaceous units on the cheek, so they may see more acne on the cheeks. The concentration, distribution, and activity of these sebaceous units varies from person to person. That’s why some people might suffer with acne more on their forehead compared to others who might have it more on the chest.

 

Q: Do topical treatments work for acne scarring?

A: Unfortunately, topical treatments are not particularly useful for most types of acne scarring. However, they do work for a subtype of acne scars, called macular scarring. This is essentially small patches of intense redness or pigmentation that is a very early form of scarring. Using Vitamin A preparation in all various concentrations and forms can help prevent acne scarring and in some mild cases reverse this macular type of scarring. However, for the atrophic scars, such as box scars, ice pick scars and rolling scars, the best treatments are slightly more invasive such as micro-needling; derma-stamping and injectable gels such as Profhilo.

 

Q: Does toothpaste work on pimples?

A: The myth of using toothpaste is really a cosmetic one. Applying toothpaste to a spot can quickly but temporarily reduce redness and swelling by drying it out, but it will not help to clear the spot. In fact, toothpaste can really irritate the skin. Typically, toothpaste contains ingredients such as alcohol menthol and hydrogen peroxide. These things all have the potential to dry out acne, but they also risk causing real irritation which in turn can lead to an overproduction of oils in the skin.

 

Q: Does my period cause acne?

A: When a woman is on her period, the hormonal changes can trigger your sebaceous glands to secrete more oil or what we call sebum, this can cause pores to block and result in a breakout of acne – this often occurs a few days before your period starts. When you’re having hormonal skin changes, usually making your skin oilier, you should wash your face regularly in the morning and evening, and even consider using a different cleanser containing Salicylic Acid (BHA) during those days. Make sure you reduce the chances of getting blocked pores, so remove makeup before going to bed.

 

Q: Does sweat cause acne?

A: Excessive levels of sweating from exercise for example, can lead to clogging up of the pores which can in turn affect people that are prone to acne. It can also trigger acne in milder forms for those that don’t have a pre-existing condition. That said, although sweat can negatively impact the skin, exercise is good because it increases the blood flow, which washes away the toxins, leading to more healthy skin. It also reduces the oxidative stress and counteracts the reactive oxygen species between the oxidative sweat, which is good for the skin.

 

Q: What ingredients should you look out for on acne products?

A: For more mild forms of acne that may appear on healthy skin, ingredients such as glycolic acid or salicylic acid in cleansers can certainly help. There are also some over the counter products that contain mild anti-inflammatory ingredients to help with the treatment and prevention of acne. The main ingredient in these is niacinamide, an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory which is becoming more popular in acne treatment.

To quickly clear up a new break-out, benzoyl peroxide is useful and will dry out spots and kill bacteria.

 

Q: Does the sun clear up acne?

A: Yes UVA/UVB rays can improve the appearance of acne by killing off the associated bacteria. However, UV is well known to cause sun damage effects on the skin so it is not recommended to rely on this method.

A much safer photo-dynamic therapy involves using red and blue light to kill bacteria and encourage skin repair, and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) is also useful to improve the redness and other discoloration caused by acne.

 

Dr Toni’s Top products to treat acne which can all be purchased in our nationwide clinics:

Cleansers – OBAGI Clenziderm or Dermaquest DermaClear BHA Cleanser

Correction – Dermaquest DermaClear Serum (day or night) or Dermaquest Retinol Brightening Serum (night only)

Protection – Heliocare 360 Dry Touch Gel SPF50 or Heliocare Mineral Tolerance SPF50

For more top tips on how to care for your skin tune in for regular updates via the Instagram page @DestinationSkin.

Book your free consultation now

 


Book A Free Consultation

Our booking procedure is quick and easy. Simply fill out this form and we’ll call you to book you an appointment with one of our experts.

Book a free consultation
We’d love to send you our latest news, offers, treatment and product information via email and SMS, but if you’d rather not hear from us, please tick the box below.